Pine Hawk Fall Programs

To inquire about Pine Hawk activities or to be added to the Pine Hawk event notification list, please e-mail:   Pinehawk@mit.edu


Detail from the Pine Hawk exhibition at the Acton Memorial Library

 

Printable Programs List

 

FALL 2019 PINE HAWK ARCHAEOLOGY PROGRAMS

 

Wednesday, October 2, 7:00 p. m.

LIFE IN 17TH CENTURY NEW ENGLAND

Historians have spoken often of the Americas as a “New World” without ever delving into what that meant to 17th century explorers and settlers from Europe. National Park Service Ranger John McNiff relates how the expectations of the earliest “New” England explorers and settlers – about the climate, landscape, and even the appearance of the indigenous people – abruptly confronted a much harsher reality. Acton Memorial Library; free.

 

Thursday, October 3, 7:00 p.m.

ARCHAEOLOGY WEST OF BOSTON  

Native Americans have lived and prospered for close to 10,000 years in our area. Tonya Largy, Past President of the Massachusetts Archaeological Society and Wayland resident, will discuss several interesting archaeological projects carried out in our locality.  She will discuss how archaeologists learn from several lines of evidence, including stone tools, ceramics, and the remains of animals and plants found during excavations, and how dates are obtained from these materials. Acton Memorial Library; free.

 

Wednesday, October 9, 7:00 p. m.

BOOK DISCUSSION: ATLAS OF A LOST WORLD 

In his vivid travelogue through prehistory, author Craig Childs traces the arrivals at least twenty thousand years ago of North America’s first peoples and the artifacts that tell of their lives and fates. Part adventurer, part archaeologist, Childs visits various sites and connects what has been found at each to theories about how people first arrived there. Copies of the book will be available for loan at the library in September. Acton Memorial Library; free.

 

Thursday, October 10, 7:00 p. m.

THE FIRST PEOPLES OF THE NORTHEAST 

David DeMello, Museum Director, Robbins Museum of Archaeology, speaks about the journey of the First People in the Northeast as interpreted from the archaeological record. We follow them as they adapt their lifestyles to the changing environment, starting with the last glaciation and continuing to the contact period. Acton Memorial Library; free.

 

Wednesday, October 16, 7:00 p.m.

ANCIENT WINTERS AT THE FLAGG SWAMP ROCKSHELTER 

Eric Johnson, Lecturer in the University of Massachusetts-Amherst Anthropology Department, provides a retrospective on the 1980 laboratory analysis and results from the excavation of this remarkable site in Marlborough, Massachusetts. He discusses the identification of animals now or recently extinct in Massachusetts, how the site was used as a winter home 4,000 years ago, and how people lived through New England winters without the modern conveniences we know.  Acton Memorial Library; free.   

 

Tuesday, October 22, 7:00 p.m.

FROM PINE HAWK TO TRAIL THROUGH TIME: REVEALING OUR PAST 

Former Acton Health Director Doug Halley describes the discovery of the Pine Hawk archaeological site and its significance. He relates how the project activated increased interest in historical preservation, leading to the restoration of the Acton Stone Chamber and to continuing work on Acton's Trail Through Time. Acton Memorial Library; free.

 

Saturday, October 26, 10 a.m. - Noon

ADULT ARCHAEOLOGY WALK 

The Archaeology walk will tour six sites on the south side of Nashoba Brook along Acton’s Trail Through Time. These include four Native American ceremonial sites.  Meet at the Wheeler Lane parking lot, 10:00 a.m. Wear sturdy walking shoes. Bring tick spray, rain gear, sun protection, water as appropriate. Rain date is Saturday, November 2, 10 a.m. - Noon. Trail is easy to moderate. Allow 1.5 hours. Free.

 

Tuesday, October 29, 7:00 p.m.

ARCHAEOLOGICAL ODDITIES IN NORTH AMERICA

Ken Feder, Ph.D., of Central Connecticut State University asks if archaeologists should rewrite textbooks to include various archaeological oddities found in North America. While his short answer is no, that doesn’t make the stories behind them any less interesting. He discusses claims of a hidden history these oddities suggest as described in his book Archaeological Oddities: A Field Guide to Forty Claims of Lost Civilizations, Ancient Visitors, and Other Strange Sites in North America. Acton Memorial Library; free.        

 

Sunday, November 10, 1:00-3:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY SERVICE DAY 

This annual effort again takes place on the Trail Through Time, a multicultural heritage trail in the North Acton conservation lands. The focus will be on trail and mound maintenance. All ages welcome. Optional brunch beforehand at Legend's Cafe in West Acton at 11:30 AM. To volunteer, contact Linda McElroy at Meadowpond1@comcast.net or Bob Ferrara at 978-429-8227 or rferrara67@gmail.com.

 

Past Programs

 

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