Nineteenth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry
Three Years (Re-enlisted)

 

Acton men who served in the 19th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry:

James P. Clare, Co. E

Elijah H. Mansur, Co. G (P.O.W.)

Joseph H. Newcomb, Co. B

Regimental history from Massachusetts Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines in the Civil War, compiled and published by the Adjutant General:

    The 19th Regt. Mass. Vol. Inf. was organized at Camp Schouler, Lynnfield, having for its nucleus the 1st Battalion Rifles. The rest of the regiment came from Boston and vicinity. By Aug. 28, 1861, the entire regiment had been mustered into the service with Col. Edward W. Hinks as its commander, and on that day it was forwarded to Washington, arriving Aug. 30. Assigned to Gen. Lander's Brigade, Gen. Stone's Corps of Observation, it picketed the Potomac during the fall of 1861, advancing to Harrison's Island October 21 and covering the retreat of the troops from Ball's Bluff. The winter of 1861-62 was spent at Muddy Branch guarding the Potomac in front of Darnestowin and Rockville.
     In March, 1862, the regiment, now in Dana's Brigade, Sedgwick's Division, was sent to the Shenandoah, but shortly afterward the entire division was ordered to the Peninsula where it arrived Mar. 30, and was attached to Sumner's (2d) Corps. It took part in the siege of Yorktown in April and was engaged at Fair Oaks, June 25. At Glendale or Nelson's Farm, June 30, it lost 145 officers and men of whom 33, including Major Howe, were killed or mortally wounded.
     Returning from Harrison's Landing to Alexandria the last of August, early in September joined in the advance toward Frederick, Md. It arrived at South Mountain on the 14th just after the battle was done. At Antietam, Sept. 17, it was heavily engaged in the West Wood, suffering severe loss including Col. Hinks who was badly wounded. At Fredericksburg, Dec. 11, the 19th was one of the regiments of Hall's Brigade, Howard's Division, Couch's (2d) Corps that crossed the river in boats under fire and fought their way through the streets of the city. Two days later it was in the assault on Marye's Heights, losing 104 officers and men including 8 color bearers, 23 being killed or mortally wounded. The winter of 1862--63 was spent near Falmouth.
     During the Chancellorsville campaign in May, 1863, with Gibbon's Division the 19th was left in Fredericksburg in support of Sedgwick's (6th) Corps and suffered small loss. At Gettysburg, July 2 and 3, it was heavily engaged near the Clump of Trees capturing four Confederate flags and losing nearly 50 per cent of its numbers. On October 14 it was engaged at Bristoe Station, and again at Robertson's Tavern, November 27, during the Mine Run expedition. It spent the winter at Cole's Hill near Stevensburg. Here Dec. 20, 160 officers and men re-enlisted for three years.
     As a part of Webb's Brigade, Gibbon's Division, Hancock's (2d) Corps the 19th was in action at the Wilderness, May 6, and was heavily engaged at Spottsylvania, both in the assault on the Bloody Angle, May 12, and in the general assault, May 18.
     At North Anna, Totopotomoy, Cold Harbor, and in front of Petersburg the regiment was engaged almost continuously until June 22, when the 2d Corps was outflanked near the Jerusalem Plank road, where the 19th lost all but 40 of its officers and men. These, with a remnant received from the 15th Regt. and many returned convalescents and recruits preserved the regimental unit. In July and August it was present in both actions near Deep Bottom and at Reams' Station. On August 30, 98 men whose terms of service had expired were discharged to date from August 28, 1864.
     The regiment was on duty in the forts and batteries around Petersburg until October when it was engaged with loss at Boydton Road. About Dec. 12, it was ordered to Fort Emory where it remained until the spring campaign of 1865 opened. On February 5 it was engaged at Hatcher's Run, and in April participated in the final assault on Petersburg and the pursuit of Lee's army toward Appomattox. After the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia the regiment, increased by recruits to 20 officers and 645 enlisted men, marched back to Washington city, and on June 30 was mustered out at Munson's Hill. Returning to Massachusetts, on July 20 it was mustered for the last time at Readville, and there paid off and discharged.

 

 


Regimental history from A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, by Frederick Dyer:

   Organized at Lynnfield August 28, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., August 30. Attached to Lander's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Lander's Brigade, Stone's (Sedgwick's) Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Army Corps, to June, 1865.

    SERVICE.---Camp at Meridian Hill until September 12, 1861. Moved to Poolesville, Md., September 12-15. Guard duty on the Upper Potomac until December. Operations on the Potomac October 21-24. Action at Ball's Bluff October 21. Moved to Muddy Run December 4, and duty there until March 12, 1862. Moved to Harper's Ferry, thence to Charlestown and Berryville March 12-15. Ordered to Washington, D.C., March 24, and to the Peninsula March 27. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. West Point May 7-8. Battle of Fair Oaks, Seven Pines, May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Oak Grove, near Fair Oaks, June 25. Peach Orchard and Savage Station June 29. White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. Harrison's Landing July 8. At Harrison's Landing until August 15. Movement to Alexandria August 15-28, thence to Fairfax C. H. August 28-31. Cover Pope's retreat from Bull Run August 31-September 1. Maryland Campaign September-October. Battle of South Mountain September 14 (Reserve). Battle of Antietam September 16-17. Moved to Harper's Ferry September 22, and duty there until October 30. Advance up Loudon Valley and movement to Falmouth, Va., October 30-November 17. Battle of Fredericksburg December 11-15. (Forlorn hope to cross Rappahannock at Fredericksburg December 11.) Duty at Falmouth, Va., until April, 1863. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Maryes' Heights. Fredericksburg, May 3. Salem Heights May 3-4. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg July 2-4, Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Bristoe Station October 14. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Robertson's Tavern, or Locust Grove, November 27. At Stevensburg until May, 1864. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May-June. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7. Laurel Hill May 8. Spottsylvania May 8-12. Po River May 10. Spottsylvania C. H. May 12-21. Assault on the Salient May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864. to April 2, 1865. Jerusalem Plank Road June 22-23, 1864. Demonstration north of the James July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, August 14-18. Ream's Station August 25. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Watkin's House March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Crow's House March 31. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Sailor's Creek April 6. High Bridge and Farmville April 7. Appomattox C. H. April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. At Burkesville until May 2. March to Washington May 2-13. Grand Review May 23. Duty at Washington until June 30. Mustered out June 30 and discharged July 22, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 14 Officers and 147 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 133 Enlisted men by disease. Total 294.